Gorham Chantilly:The timeless, unique, & brief history of a flatware

The aroma of the food prepared for the whole family touches your nose –the scent slowly entices your already rumbling tummy. You see the table being set for the lavish feast that everyone will be enjoying in just a  few more minutes. The plates and glasses are equally as beautiful as the flatwares in your sight. Stepping closer, the lustrous property of the flatware becomes more appealing. Touching it matches the smoothness of your palm and fingers. The design is very intricate as your thumb runs down and checks it. Genuinely, that is a work of art.

If you are not familiar with the names and distinctions of every flatware but you remembered being amazed with a certain collection, chances are that set has the Gorham Chantilly pattern. This is the most popular flatware ever manufactured of all time. It is known worldwide with the elegant design, hence, this is a favorite to be collected. Silver crafted in the most elaborate pattern will definitely suit even the meticulous scrutiny.

 

From Humble Beginnings

This craft has a rich history. Everything began in 1831, inside the humble workshop of Jabez Gorham, a skillful craftsman from Providence, Rhode Island. Together with Henry Webster, they started creating thimbles, teaspoons, combs, jewelries, and some other small products which are all made of silver. However, their main product is the silver spoon. In 1847, great innovations happened as soon as John Gorham, son of Jabez Gorham, became the head of the company right after his father retired. John took opportunity of what the Industrial Revolution offered. He incorporated the mechanized mass production method. For further improvements, he enhanced the available designs, and refurnished the premises to create more space and widen their offered product line.

 

Unstoppable Progress

The progress he desired for the company did not stop there. In 1852, he visited several silver workshops and manufacturing companies in Europe. There, he searched for craftsmen, toolmakers and other experts in the field of silverware. He even hired a leading designer and workshop manager from England by the name of George Wilkonson. In 1895, the brainchild of the designer William Christmas Codman came to life. Codman’s creativity gave birth to the Chantilly pattern. From then on, it has been the best-selling flatware pattern of the company.

 

The Chantilly Pattern 

The lovely border, unadorned center, and fleur-de-lis tip of the Gorham Chantilly were derived from the inspiration brought by the Roccoco style from the 18th century French Regency Era. It was named after the well-known Chantilly palace in France. Along with this inspiration, the Gorham Chantilly   has the symmetrical fan plume design and polished finish. Because of its popularity, even prominent personalities choose this as their flatware. One of whom is the President of the United States. Whenever he boards the Air Force One, this is the choice flatware in the US Presidential Jet. This is also a well-loved flatware by newlyweds.

Since it’s a well-known brand, Gorham Chantilly’s replacement pieces are easy to find. In case one of your utensils bearing this pattern was accidentally marked with a scratch, you don’t have to worry that your collection will become incomplete.

If you want to pair your sumptous dishes with royalty-like flatwares, Gorham Chantilly will be a match made in heaven for your taste. What a lovely collection will this be for your table setting! You will also do an acquisition of a long-term asset in your kitchen. Timeless, elegance, and beauty—all rolled in one in every flatware with the Gorham Chantilly pattern.

Gorham-Sald-Fork Gorham-Teaspoon

You may also visit, www.TheEscapePlace.com for more Gorham Stainless Flatware.

Spots on Stainless Steel Flatware

In 1913, Harry Brearly, an English metallurgist, accidentally concocted a metal mixture which has revolutionized our everyday life. He was working on a project to improve rifle barrels but discovered that adding chromium to low carbon steel gives it stain resistance, thus giving birth to “stainless steel”. Chromium in the steel combines with oxygen in the atmosphere to form a thin, invisible layer of chrome-containing oxide called passive film. If the passive film is scratched or disrupted, oxide will form and recover the surface, preventing corrosion.

Stainless steel is used in almost anything from bridges, monuments and sculptures (some examples include the Unisphere in New York and the Cloud Gate at Chicago), automotive bodies, passenger rail cars, aircraft, jewelry, etc. Most of all, stainless steel has been introduced to homes across the world due to the invention of stainless steel flatware.

Despite the moniker of being “stainless”, our flatware isn’t actually stain-proof. Passive film requires oxygen to repair, so those that have been kept in low-oxygen areas or exposed to certain chemicals can have “spots”. Knowing some tips and tricks on stainless steel flatware maintenance will help restore your cutlery’s immaculate glory.

 

Care During First Time Use

  • When using stainless steel flatware for the first time, hand wash it thoroughly in hot water using mild soap or detergent. It’s important to use hot or warm water because  it will remove all soap residues which cause cutlery to dull. After rinsing, dry the silverware using a towel as air-drying them would often lead to spots.

 

Care During Everyday Use

  • Caring for your silverware during everyday use entails avoiding use for food that have high acid content such as tea, coffee, mayonnaise, tomato sauce, and citrus fruits.
  • It’s also advisable to rinse cutlery immediately after use as stuck food particles can cause corrosion.
  • When using a dishwasher, remember to load fork and spoons with their handles down, and avoid mixing stainless steel flatware with tableware made out of a different metal type in the same compartment or load.
  • Never ever soak flatware overnight! Oxygen levels in water are low which lead to the breakdown of oxides that create protective corrosion layers.
  • Do not pour detergent or soap directly on your flatware. It’s best to discharge it unto a sponge and use that to scrub their surfaces.
  • Do not allow your cutlery to overheat. For example, leaving it on a hot burner or using it to stir boiling food.
  • Avoid using steel wool to scrub stains from your stainless steel cutlery; because it can damage the surface and finish of the flatware.
  • Cleaners containing lemon or orange additives can also cause corrosion.
  • Do not use alcohol or oven cleaners to scrub difficult stains.

 

How do I remove stains or spots in my cutlery?

If prevention isn’t enough and you still find stubborn stains on your flatware, there are several hacks which you can keep in mind in order to restore their spotless glow.

 

1)     Go the olive oil and washcloth route. To begin, clean the surface with non-abrasive soap, or baking soda and water. Then, apply olive oil to a washcloth and use this to wipe surface stains. Wipe excess oil with a clean, dry rag or a paper towel. This will also give it a little shine.

2)     Use undiluted white vinegar. Some people swear by this method even though white vinegar has a funky smell. This is especially effective if your flatware stains are caused by heat.

3)     The aluminum foil method. With this method, you’ll need a large skillet, aluminum foil, and water. First, place a large sheet of aluminum foil on the base of a large skillet. Fill the ¾ with hot water and add a teaspoon of salt and baking soda. Slide the cutlery in and let the water boil for 5 minutes. Then, turn off the heat and allow the water to cool before removing the stainless steel cutlery. Rinse each piece with warm tap water and towel dry with a clean cloth. Voila! Clean cutlery!

4)     Use a rust-fighting product with oxalic acid. But only use this as a last resort! This solution should only be attempted under dire circumstances because oxalic acid is a strong chemical solution.

 

Check out The Escape Place ebay store for great collection of stainless steel silver.

These are our Oneida Collection Stainless Steel Silverware. You may click on each picture to check out the item.

Oneida Arbor Rose Spoons       Oneida Dinner KnifeOneida Cherbourg Dinner Knives       Oneida Cherbourg Pattern Salad Forks

Stainless Flatware: The Importance of 18/10 VS 18/0

When you’re in the market for stainless steel flatware, you might come across terms such as “18/10 Stainless Steel”, “18/0 Stainless Steel” or in some cases, “18/8 Stainless Steel”.  But what do they all really mean? Is it the quality of the steel? The way it was made? Or maybe, some fancy gimmick to justify one set being more expensive than the other, even though it doesn’t look any better than the cheaper one? Let’s find out.

Flatware Stainless Steel

Stainless steel used on flatware will have different compositions depending on their applications.  But the main ingredients are Chromium and Nickel which add to its corrosion resistance.  Chromium is a hard substance, and is essentially used as a hardener.  Nickel is a silvery metal that doesn’t easily corrode and thus is used to enhance corrosion resistance.  Technically, a higher content of each will be more resilient to pitting and rusting, making them easy to maintain.  Too much Chromium content, however, will result in brittleness which will be unpractical for everyday use.

The Numbers and What They Are

18/10 or 18/0 is simply a numerical representation of how much chromium and nickel the stainless steel has in a particular set.

  • 18/10 – 18% Chromium and 10% Nickel
  • 18/0 – 18% Chromium and 0% Nickel

In general, since most flatware will have the same 18% Chromium; the higher the Nickel content, the more resistant it is to corrosion.  However, it is important to note that Nickel is quite expensive which means that sets with high nickel content will cost more as well.

Understanding what they mean

Aside from corrosion resistance, 18/10 and 18/0 stainless steel can differ in appearance and of course, as mentioned earlier, price.  18/10 stainless steel will have more luster than its little brother, the 18/0.  It will also be more durable and will likely be more capable to withstand daily use.  On the other hand, because it has more Nickel content (which is expensive), these sets will generally cost more than those made with 18/0 stainless steel.  18/10 stainless steel flatware will be heavier, more balanced, and have a better “feel” than their 18/0 counterparts.

Although 18/10 is the hands down winner, 18/0 stainless steel isn’t as bad as one might think.  They’re relatively strong and inexpensive.  They may not be as corrosion resistant or as durable as their big brother, the 18/10; but, with a little extra care and common sense, they will last a long time serving their purpose.

There you have it.  These are basically what you need to know about 18/10 and 18/0 stainless steel flatware.  The next time you check out flatware sets, you should know what to look for.  If you really want quality craftsmanship that is durable, that has a good feel and overall appearance, but without minding the extra expense; go for 18/10 Stainless Steel.  However, if your definition of what practical is includes price, don’t be afraid to look at 18/0 stainless steel sets.  Just remember to trust your instincts.  Read the label.  Ask somebody to open them up and try to have a feel of it in your hand.  You will come across items that claim they are what they are not.  Keep in mind that if it’s too good to be true, it probably is.

Check out our Oneida Stainless Steel Flatware.